Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock Review - The Next Level

Game Profile

System:
Xbox 360
Release date:
October 28, 2007
Publisher:
Activision
Developer:
Neversoft
Players:
1 - 2
Genre:
Music Action
ESRB:
T

Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock

You've got to breathe and have some fun.

Review by Chris Bahn (Email)
January 4th 2008

It's safe to say that I'll probably never reach this kid's level of expertise, but that doesn't faze me one bit. To briefly jump on the PR bandwagon, the Guitar Hero franchise is one of the hottest franchises on the market. This is old news to all you diehard purists out there, but newcomers like myself have only recently become aware of its greatness. Next to the iPhone, Rock Band and the Nintendo Wii, everyone seemed to have Guitar Hero III on their holiday shopping lists. Sorry Elmo, your days are numbered.

Before starting out, players can choose from a variety of characters, guitars and apparel; most of which will become accessible from completing specific songs or purchasing from the in-game store. As you advance throughout the career, new locations with progressively tougher tunes can be enjoyed. Jamming on Guitar Hero III will be familiar territory to anyone who's played the last two installments. Simply time the colored frets in tune with the song to dazzle the crowd. If you're hungry for points, Star Power is your strongest asset, as it doubles any score multiplier you currently have.


Next to the iPhone, Rock Band and the Nintendo Wii, everyone seemed to have Guitar Hero III on their holiday shopping lists. Sorry Elmo, your days are numbered.

Just a quick forewarning, especially if patience isn't your strongest quality, spending some time with the extensive training mode will ensure that you don't end up tossing the guitar across the room. I found hitting the frets on cue to be rather easy, but hitting chords and using the whammy bar in conjunction with frets initially left me uneasy. In similar fashion to its rival Rock Band, players can skip over any training that proves too difficult, though you're bound to feel awkward when you hit center stage.

The Career Mode is divided into four skill levels that can be tackled solo or with a friend. Easy is perfect for beginners, utilizing only three fret buttons while the more advanced levels require additional use of four or more. Only true masters should consider taking on the Expert mode which demands frantic execution of all five fret buttons and chords galore. Suffice it to say, I have a LONG way to go before I take on that level. As a newcomer, one should expect some difficulty adjusting to the rhythm, coordination and consistency that's demanded from Guitar Hero III, but persistence and patience will pay off. I am not saying you'll end up like the next Lenny Kravitz, Gene Simmons or even the 8-year old YouTube sensation above, but you'll be less tempted to part with it.

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