Dragon Age: Origins - Witch Hunt Review - The Next Level

Game Profile

System:
PC
Release date:
September 8, 2010
Publisher:
Electronic Arts
Developer:
Bioware
Players:
1
Genre:
RPG
ESRB:
M

Dragon Age: Origins - Witch Hunt

Some witches should stay lost.

Review by Nick Vlamakis (Email)
September 10th 2010

Since I spent the the entire first third of this year happily playing nothing but Dragon Age games (Origins, Awakenings, downloadable content (DLC), and even the Web browser game), I'm certainly looking forward to next year's sequel. My feelings are mixed about the spate of DLC that's been released to supplement BioWare's masterpiece, but if something comes out that interests me, it's no big deal to spend five to ten dollars for the added thrills.

Playing through Dragon Age: Origins - Witch Hunt, it is almost impossible not to wonder what exactly you paid for. If it's to explore uncharted areas in Ferelden, you'll be disappointed with the shamelessly recycled and geographically limited settings. You get access to only a handful of points on the map, all of which you've seen before.


Playing through Dragon Age: Origins - Witch Hunt, it's almost impossible not to wonder what exactly you paid for.

If your goal was to learn more about Morrigan, then you might as well stay in your castle, because what you discover can fit into the eye of a newt. Finding Morrigan is ostensibly the point of the exercise, but she really feels like a gimmick to sell a simple quest for an elven artifact. You're given two new companions and a Mabari hound, and that's who you spend almost the entire episode interacting with.

If, like me, you just want a little more Dragon Age to play, you will be almost as let down as the Morrigan fans. Truly, there is little point in making an effort to tweak your companions' stats or tactics. If your imported character is strong enough to make it in the other quests, you can pretty much carry your team to victory here. There's the introduction of a new boss creature, but since Dragon Age 2 has already been revealed, and given all the other complaints about Witch Hunt (no new areas, woefully short length, more questions than answers), I would have loved to see this as a giveaway from EA and BioWare to keep fans hungry for future endeavors.

But even though I'm filing Dragon Age: Origins - Witch Hunt in the "unapologetic money grab" category, I still have to rate it as a game. You do get a little bit of story (I play these games very, very thoroughly and it took me about two hours and twenty minutes to beat), more of what makes the series so good, multiple endings, and you're rewarded with some exclusive loot and achievements. (Again, free would have been more appropriate and would have built up some good will for the publisher. I doubt this add-on will generate that much revenue anyway.) As quests go, it's not a bad one, except for the very last conversation and the abrupt and confusing rolling of the credits that follows it.

So Dragon Age: Origins - Witch Hunt is worth playing but not worth buying. A game as enigmatic as the witch of the wilds herself.

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