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Thread: Storyboarding Resources

  1. Storyboarding Resources

    So my most recent job requires that I storyboard out some animated sequences for television. I haven't seriously storyboarded anything since college (years ago) and I'm pretty rusty on the conventions. I know some people here like Cigs and Yellerdog have tv experience, so I was wondering if there's any good online or printed resource for typical storyboarding notations and standards.

  2. I've found "Setting up your Shots" by Jeremy Vineyard pretty good. It details each type of camera movement and different techniques, talks about which films use them, and then shows how they would look in storyboard form.
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  3. #3
    Don Bluth's "Art of Storyboard" is a pretty good book in terms of traditional storyboarding for animation. Kinda basic though. Something like the book "Film Directing: Shot by Shot" would be a good pickup if you're trying to get a more general feel for building coherent scenes.

    Animation Meat has some decent templates here: http://www.animationmeat.com/templates/templates.html

    My current job has me basically building animatics in Flash, let me know if you have any specific questions and I'll try my best to answer 'em.
    Quote Originally Posted by Razor Ramon View Post
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    I'm sure whatever Yeller wrote is fascinating!

  4. Thanks for the info guys! Those templates in particular are pretty handy, I was just about to make one myself in Illustrator. Chances are someone else will be handling the animatics but I'll be generating the individual objects and b/g's used in them at some point.

    Shin, that book you recommended got some scathing reviews on Amazon. I'll check the bookstores around here before ordering, see if they show me what I need.

  5. #5
    Awesome! My job at the moment consists of taking a bunch of rough, rough thumbnail drawings from the supervisors and stretching 'em out into coherent scenes. They usually provide me with an audio track, and I establish all the acting and the timing and the action based on that, making cuts in the audio where needed. Whoop whoop digital workflow!

    You seem like you are probably starting at the script stage, so I'd recommend starting with simple, simple thumbnail drawings and fleshing it out from there.
    Quote Originally Posted by Razor Ramon View Post
    I don't even the rage I mean )#@($@IU_+FJ$(U#()IRFK)_#
    Quote Originally Posted by Some Stupid Japanese Name View Post
    I'm sure whatever Yeller wrote is fascinating!

  6. Quote Originally Posted by FuryFox View Post
    Shin, that book you recommended got some scathing reviews on Amazon. I'll check the bookstores around here before ordering, see if they show me what I need.
    Damn the Amazon!

    I don't know its a small relatively cheap book that lays things out in simple terms. I thought it was good as an intro to storyboarding.

    That's all I've got to recommend though. I kind of just picked up storyboarding from a lot of trial and error.

    Good luck though, also don't you have a waccom tablet? I say draw it digitally, its nice to be able to keep background, foreground, and characters on seperate layers for handing off to be turned into an animatic.
    Where I play
    Quote Originally Posted by Dolemite
    I've changed my mind about Korian. Anyone that can piss off so many people so easily is awesome. You people are suckers, playing right into his evil yellow hands.

  7. Stay far away from Shot by Shot, that's one of those books some guy who never boarded a show in his life tells you to get for his class.

    Unfortunately what you really need is a couple of real production boards to look at, but you can't get those without knowing someone who trusts you.

    Storyboarding is less about knowing a list of technical terms than being able to compose a scene well, laying things out and creating a pleasant flow to the story. If it's for animation, it's important to create clear poses that read well, funny drawings that sell the jokes, and set up scenes in such a way that someone will actually be able to animate it. If you can't animate none of it will flip and it'll be a nightmare that someone else down the line will be dealing with.

    Don't draw a bunch of crowd scenes taking place in an amusement park with everything exploding all the time. Another thing to be conscious of for animation is creating setups that can be reused. If you have several scenes that are similar, but only slightly different in terms of layout consolidate them and create a setup that can be reused. Don't do a million closeups either, you're going to want to.

    So many people have a hand in a finished storyboard anyway (sb artist, revisionists, cleanup, timing director, character designer, director, etc etc.) that the least of your concerns is labeling everything correctly.

  8. #8
    Come to think of it, I have worked more shows than that particular professor... shit.

    How's the west coast job market these days, mr. cat? East coast seems to be going to hell every other week.
    Last edited by YellerDog; 06 Nov 2008 at 01:12 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Razor Ramon View Post
    I don't even the rage I mean )#@($@IU_+FJ$(U#()IRFK)_#
    Quote Originally Posted by Some Stupid Japanese Name View Post
    I'm sure whatever Yeller wrote is fascinating!

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