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Thread: "I'm Staring at the Future of Gaming"

  1. Quote Originally Posted by Fe 26 View Post
    I don't think I was very impressed with Wolf 3D and Doom because of flight and racing sims. It seemed like a rational next step ("If I can simulate flying, why not simulate war?")
    So you looked at Doom, and said "Oh, that's just a flight simulator, except inside a space station and the planes are zombies," without any regard for the technology involved in actually making the game look how it did?

    Wolfenstein 3D came out in 1992, and for the next year, all anyone in the industry could do was try to make Wolf clones that might look almost as good. Doom came out among all these games that were considered cutting edge just one year after Wolfenstein 3D and looked a full generation better than EVERY other game on the shelves. If that didn't impress you, there's something strange about how you process information.

  2. Microsoft Flight Simulator 95: Gateway to Phobos

  3. Quote Originally Posted by Yoshi View Post
    Great thread, despite what some asshat will inevitably come in here and say.

    I'm trying not to look at others' lists so that mine is as pure as my fading memory allows. Here goes:
    [list][*]Pac-Man/Donkey Kong (2600) - "I'm playing arcade games at home!"
    You picked two of the worst arcade conversions for the 2600. How about Space Invaders and Missile Command?


    Alright, here's mine.


    Tank (Kee Games): I really didn't realize what I was playing at the roller rink around 1975, but I was amazed by what the game had to offer over pinball and all the other mechanical machines. I was only 7 at the time when I'd played it.

    Space Invaders:Yeah, I'd played pong on some crappy home console, but Space Invaders was the game that made me realize that videogames were something special. It was the first time that I'd realized I wanted to play this stuff over pinball.

    Battlezone: The first time I'd seen this game at the bowling alley, I didn't know what it was. At first I thought it was some kind of Sub-marine game, when I saw what looked like a periscope veiwer. I thought every game in the future would be 3D.

    Space Harrier (Deluxe Edition): When I'd lived in Phoenix, my friends and I would often go the Golf N' Stuff. It had one of the larger arcades in North America with 2 stories of arcade games of every make and kind. The first time I'd seen Space Harrier, Golf N' Stuff had the deluxe version with all of the hydraulic movement. They'd also have the same setup for After-Burner and it was then that I'd realized that Sega was the new king of the arcades.

    Galaxian 3: I've only seen this uber-expensive arcade machine once, while traveling out of state. I honestly don't know where I'd seen it, but I do recall thinking Namco would have more games available for this cool setup. I'm guessing the $5 for less than 15 minutes of gametime might have been the system killer.





    Test Drive (Amiga): I remember the first time I'd saw an Amiga in person, was when my friends dad had bought an Amiga 1000 in 1985. I'd seen all of the images for the computer in magazines, but my friend's dad didn't buy games for his system. It wouldn't be until a year or 2 later that I'd witness Test Drive on demo at a Federated store in phoenix. I was stunned when I saw the movement steering wheel, and (at the time) a real looking dash board. The car's engine sounded real, and the opening sequence had realistic sounding music. Years later when I could finally afford an Amiga 500, I'd come to realize the game wasn't all that great, but it had its moments.

    Phantasy Star Online: I remember the first time my party had encountered the dragon and defeated it. I'd thought: "This was the future of RPGs!" I'd later play Phantasy Star: Universe, and wonder:"Why did I like this so much?" I really didn't enjoy it like I had the first game, but PSO was one of the earliest console games I'd taken online.
    Last edited by gamevet; 23 Nov 2011 at 08:52 PM.

  4. I don't think deluxe Space Harrier had hydraulic movement, I think the throttle slide the seat around like Thunderblade, no?

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Frogacuda View Post
    I don't think deluxe Space Harrier had hydraulic movement, I think the throttle slide the seat around like Thunderblade, no?
    I could have sworn that Golf N' Stuff had it set up on hydraulics, but it was probably more like this video. It does have forward, back, left and right movement.

    Last edited by gamevet; 24 Nov 2011 at 01:27 AM.

  6. Yeah, I guess somewhere in between what you said and what I said. I remembered it just sliding, not tilting, but I've only seen one in person maybe once.
    Last edited by Frogacuda; 24 Nov 2011 at 01:24 AM.

  7. Power Drift (Sega arcade): Sega's scaled-sprite racer one-upped Out Run with its undulating 3D tracks. I did not think it would be portable onto any home system. Genesis could probably have done a version with good gameplay but watered-down graphics if the right developer (Not CRI who bungled Galaxy Force II) would have worked on it.

    Revenge of Shinobi (Gen): This was one of the games that defined 16-bit graphics. Yuzo Koshiro's soundtrack was 110% incredible at the game's release, especially "Make Me Dance", "Terrible Beat" (the boss tune- appropriately brutal sounding for a fight to the death), "Run or Die", and "Ninja Step".

    Space Harrier SDX: I found this at a Kings Island arcade in the early 90s for 2 quarters a play. Better late than never, though. This one DID have the tilting hydraulic chair.

    Space Harrier (32X): Same graphics as the arcade, but at 30 FPS. Even at a reduced frame rate, it was still amazing and a good sign of things to come.

    Galactic Attack/Layer Section (Sat): This shooter's scaling, line-scrolling (some Genesis games do use LS but not to the extent seen here), and other special effects definitely could not happen on Genesis or even 32X. Even the intro is amazing, from the moment the radio voice says "This is the control tower. Make a left turn. Over!". As expected from Taito, Zuntata's BGM doesn't disappoint. The lock-on system and its accompanying scoreplay mechanic are nice. It looks almost identical to the arcade Rayforce if played in Tate.

    Raiden Project (PS1): It's got a perfect arcade port of Raiden II, which was still a fairly new game at the PS1's launch.

    Doom (PC): A major jump over Wolfenstein- the level designs have depth. Shame the 32X version wasn't a 40 Meg cart instead of 24 and that it suffered the Launch Time Rush Syndrome.

    Alien vs. Predator (Arc): A beat-em-up that really expanded on the Final Fight mechanic and added some big fucking guns to the weapon selection. The orchestral BGM is epic, especially the militaristic theme from Round 5 "Secrets". The Predator Warrior is fun to play as, especially having some flashier moves than Schaefer or Kurosawa. His Flying Kick (down, up+attack) is truly vicious.

    Neo-Geo CD: Getting the Neo-Geo arcade games at home without the $200+ cart prices was the big appeal, at least until later titles required some cuts (animation frames dropped in a few newer fighters, while the 688-Meg Garou got saved for Dreamcast instead. SNK probably realized the NGCD didn't have enough RAM for that.). While the load times were usually long, this had to do until I nabbed an MVS 1-slot.

    Serious Sam (PC): When SS came out in 2001, the amazing thing was the enemy counts which were actually higher than Doom's. Unlike Quake 1 & 2 or Soldier of Fortune, you can literally find yourself mobbed by DOZENS of enemies at once. The graphics were a little better than some other FPS of the time, but the long view distance really stood out. Some great humor comes from Serious Sam's snarky comments and certain secrets you can find.

    "Your vaunted ninja skills are just cheap show."
    Finished in 2017: 23 games (AC: 3, PC: 16, PS4: 4)

  8. Quote Originally Posted by Frogacuda View Post
    Yeah, I guess somewhere in between what you said and what I said. I remembered it just sliding, not tilting, but I've only seen one in person maybe once.
    There were Afterburner Deluxe cabinets that just slide forward and back. I have a feeling that Golf N' Stuff had a custom hydraulic setup that they used for both arcade games, where they switched out the boards and marquees and ran those games with it. I distinctly remember the air sound that was coming from the hydraulics as the seat/cabinet moved around.
    Last edited by gamevet; 24 Nov 2011 at 01:33 AM.

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Frogacuda View Post
    So you looked at Doom, and said "Oh, that's just a flight simulator, except inside a space station and the planes are zombies," without any regard for the technology involved in actually making the game look how it did?
    I looked at Wolf3D,and thought that, yes. Same goes for any FPS really. I wasn't impressed by the concept of them. It seemed obvious.

    And I was pretty indifferent to the graphics of doom. It was aight, but whatever. Making games more and more three dimensional or realistic has never impressed me. Its a pretty obvious thing to do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frogacuda View Post
    there's something strange about how you process information.
    I hear that a lot, actually.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Fe 26 View Post
    I looked at Wolf3D,and thought that, yes. Same goes for any FPS really. I wasn't impressed by the concept of them. It seemed obvious.
    It wasn't the concept that was impressive, dude, it was the use of raycasting to achieve an effect that was outright impossible with the technology of the day using more traditional algorithms. That was NOT an obvious innovation.
    And I was pretty indifferent to the graphics of doom. It was aight, but whatever. Making games more and more three dimensional or realistic has never impressed me. Its a pretty obvious thing to do.
    Yeah, that's a bizarre thing to say, not because it isn't true but because it so misses the point.

    Of course everyone WANTED to make a more detailed 3D game, it was the technical achievement of actually doing it in such a way that it could run on a 386 at 33Mhz that was so mind-blowing. No one else could do that at the time, and it wasn't until about 2 years later that other games in the genre caught up to that (and even then they didn't really run on a 386).
    Last edited by Frogacuda; 24 Nov 2011 at 10:11 AM.

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