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Thread: The Tank Thread

  1. #41
    I don't think I've heard of anything overly problematic with American tanks cooling.

    I don't think any of them had a plate between the crew compartment and the engine. I think many of them sucked air through the turret and driver hatches and around the engine to cool it.

    If I recall correctly, the biggest issues with US tanks were the non standardized engines (some might have 4 or 5 different engines before the war was over), non standardized fuel requirements between engines and different vehicles in group, difficulty to get at parts to fix them on the field and relatively week main guns. They had yet to adapt the system we have now where the engine compartment can be lifted out of the tank for repairs and new engine can just be dropped in.

    France and Germany also have much milder seasons than the US, so the air being pulled into and around the engine would have been cooler.

    They had also not adapted the concept of the main battle tank. They built many tanks with main guns and armor that were never intended to take on other tanks.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Fe 26 View Post
    I don't think any of them had a plate between the crew compartment and the engine. I think many of them sucked air through the turret and driver hatches and around the engine to cool it.
    I was wrong.

    I looked at some picture. Both the Stuart and Sherman had firewalls. I must have been thinking of the m24 or m18 tanks. One of them was nick named the icebox for sucking a tremendous amount of air through the crew compartment.

  3. #43
    Anyway, here is a collection of articles on the sherman found in Manila Bay



    http://www.timawa.net/forum/index.php?topic=19186.0

  4. #44

  5. #45
    no

  6. #46
    lost tanks in Mississippi

    This M2A2 is displayed with its driver’s hatch open so the interior can be viewed. A plaque on the front of this vehicle states: “Donated by Mr. C.W. Floyd of Flora MS.”. The sign beside it reads as follows: “Mississippi’s Only Tank. Although several hundred tanks are maintained at Camp Shelby and throughout Mississippi, all are property of the United States Government except this one. During the Second World War, part of Mr. W.C. Floyd’s land was taken by the government to expand the Flora Ordnance Training Center. Mr Floyd petitioned the federal government for the return of his land in 1950. After begrudgingly paying a fee of $35, Mr. Floyd regained title to his land. When the M2A2 was discovered on the reclaimed land, Mr. Floyd donated it to the Armed Forces Museum with the understanding the tank would never again become federal property. A Tank with a Mysterious Past. The M2 was discovered with curious markings. The unit designation indicated the tank was assigned to the 80th Armored Regiment, a unit that had never trained in Mississippi. Even more puzzling were the swastikas painted on the tank’s hull. Research proved that the tank was transferred to the Flora Ordnance Training Center for training purposes after the M2s were declared obsolete in 1942. Since the tank was not assigned to another armored unit, its previous markings were not altered. The swastikas were painted on the M2 to simulate a German tank during exercises at the ordnance training Center.”
    The tank was recovered from a wooded area at the Mississippi Ordnance Plant in 1978-9. The vehicle has since been cosmetically restored and marked as discovered in the woods, F11 from 80th Armor, 8th Armored Division. It had no engine when discovered (and there is no engine in the hull). Beside the tank there is a radial engine in its original crate after being overhauled in 1945. It will eventually be placed in the M2A2. (Source: D. Moriarty).
    http://preservedtanks.com/Locations....tegoryId=74100

  7. #47
    Free tanks from Russia. All you have to do is ask...

    http://www.g503.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=82&t=212960

    THE SOVIET T-34 TANK LUMBERED MENACINGLY down the ramp of the freighter Aleksandr Starostenko. Its turret rotated until the 85-mm cannon pointed toward town. For Maj. Alexander Vorobijov, it was a triumphal moment. They would be proud of him in Moscow. He had fulfilled his mission. He had brought his tank to Milwaukee (Wisconsin).

    No, this is not the opening of some Tom Clancy-ish tale of superpower collision. It actually took place Oct. 24 (1991) on a Milwaukee dock, right here in the U.S.A. And it happened because Bob Costa, 53, asked Mikhail Gorbachev if he wouldn't mind, er, sending him a tank.

    Costa, a father of two, works as a warehouseman for Roundy's, a Pewaukee, Wis., food distributor. But military history is his obsession. In helping start the Wisconsin Military History Museum—due to open in the spring of 1993—Costa estimates he has spent $80,000 of his own money over the past 10 years.

    In 1989 Costa read about the T-34, considered by many the premier tank of World War II. He decided the museum should have one. But where to get it? Where, indeed? Costa contacted Gorbachev in May 1990. "We would display this tank with honor," he wrote. Gorby—in a message relayed through the Soviet Embassy in Washington three months later—said, "Da!"

    "It's unbelievable," says Costa, "that an average person can make a request of the President of the Soviet Union and he'd take time to approve it."

    Back in the U.S.S.R., Major Vorobijov was given the job of finding a tank, finally locating one—which had seen action against the Japanese in the closing days of the war—in an obsolete weapons yard. He had it refurbished, then accompanied it on its journey, by freighter, from St. Petersburg to Milwaukee. His pride and joy was briefly put on display at a local Pick 'N' Save grocery, owned by Roundy's, and will spend the next year at Fort Knox, Ky. In 1993 it will return to Wisconsin, as a symbol of a hot war fought 50 years ago—and of a cold war that has finally ended.

    The above is from an article that appeared in the December 23, 1991, Vol. 36, No. 24 issue of People Magazine. You can access it at: http://www.people.com/people/archive/ar ... 80,00.html

    Unfortunately, his museum never panned out so he is giving it to our museum.

  8. #48
    not a tank, but just as cool.

    Super water craft from Russia. I think it was featured in a Metal Slug.

    http://trinixy.ru/42953-yekranoplan-...3-86-foto.html
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  9. This thread is hilarious.
    Boo, Hiss.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Fe 26 View Post
    not a tank, but just as cool.

    Super water craft from Russia. I think it was featured in a Metal Slug.

    http://trinixy.ru/42953-yekranoplan-...3-86-foto.html
    This was the first thing I thought of. Close, but not quite...
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