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Thread: Common Core

  1. #1

    Common Core

    Sooooo, has anyone else had to hear about this? I've heard about it off and on since starting the new job. A meme image popped up tonight on my feed, so I decided to investigate.

    Some of it looks like a sneaky way to prepare kids for their life working as a cashier. Other stuff looks like a way to force kids to do it the way a lot of other kids had 'unofficially' been doing it anyway. Like, one problem says to break 7+7 up into 7+3+4 to get 10+4=14. Honestly, I have done that before, in my head. Something about breaking some numbers up into other numbers makes me work faster. Other stuff just looks like needless new age nonsense.

    this is what I last read

    http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...ms-alec-torres

    Click for full size


    future cashier prep

    Click for full size


    super waste of time
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  2. Looks exactly like my second grade math. I formally learned about breaking numbers up into wieldier units, too. It helped me immeasurably then and still helps me now.

    Not sure y bad

  3. We should look to a future when cashiers don't exist?

  4. #4
    I've done that in my head for years but I've never seen it taught like that.

  5. The more I think about it, the more I like the exercise. Sure, it doesn't further or work toward a seven-year-old's understanding of higher math, but it reinforces exactly the kind of critical thinking we hope to build in teaching math--breaking things into components and thinking about how they work with each other. It also makes bigger numbers than what a seven-year-old is accustomed to working with seem less intimidating, which builds confidence.

    Anecdotal, but I did have to be reminded that 117 was just 100+10+7. This kind of shit was eye-opening for me then. I can still remember going through the worksheets as a class on an overhead projector in the dark (oh god).

    Calling it "cashier training" is like saying teaching See Spot Run is grooming a generation of dog catchers. It's not about the thing. It's about the thinking behind the thing.
    Last edited by A Robot Bit Me; 21 Apr 2014 at 11:36 AM.

  6. The real question is on what new job are you repeatedly hearing this?

    I actually have always been interested in how kids learn arithmetic skills.
    Last edited by Joust Williams; 21 Apr 2014 at 11:41 AM.

  7. He can't talk about it.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Joust Williams View Post
    The real question is on what new job are you repeatedly hearing this?

    I actually have always been interested in how kids learn arithmetic skills.
    Parents at work bitching about their kids during coffee breaks

  9. Common Core isn't just math. In the course material for the math, they're just moving where the 10s are borrowed from. It's a good thing, based on actual research and such but in typical fashion, people complained about education quality then complained it was too hard/stressful for their kids when tangible changes were made.
    - calianaderderajhfjdjjdskk
    Check out my stories: guildlibrary.net

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by A Robot Bit Me View Post
    The more I think about it, the more I like the exercise. Sure, it doesn't further or work toward a seven-year-old's understanding of higher math, but it reinforces exactly the kind of critical thinking we hope to build in teaching math--breaking things into components and thinking about how they work with each other. It also makes bigger numbers than what a seven-year-old is accustomed to working with seem less intimidating, which builds confidence.

    Anecdotal, but I did have to be reminded that 117 was just 100+10+7. This kind of shit was eye-opening for me then. I can still remember going through the worksheets as a class on an overhead projector in the dark (oh god).

    Calling it "cashier training" is like saying teaching See Spot Run is grooming a generation of dog catchers. It's not about the thing. It's about the thinking behind the thing.
    Explain how this method builds critical thinking more than alternatives.

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