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Thread: Your most influential records/songs.

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowutopia View Post
    I am very thankful for the internet for giving me an opportunity to listen to so much music.
    Kids these days don't even know, man. I used to spend hundreds of dollars on import CDs and trade cassettes with pen pals and shit to hear new things. Now you just have to fire up youtube.

    There is so much out there. If you like music this is a great time to be alive.

  2. If you listened to anything even remotely underground in the 80s/early 90s, trades and samplers were really the only way you ever discovered something new. For every ten records I got in trade or ordered from a specialty distro, I was lucky if one or two were actually worth a shit.

    I don't miss those days.

  3. #23
    We found it so difficult to find the music we wanted to hear that we started a scene that, in my opinion, rivals some of the best scenes that have ever been around.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Josh View Post
    Kids these days don't even know, man. I used to spend hundreds of dollars on import CDs and trade cassettes with pen pals and shit to hear new things. Now you just have to fire up youtube.

    There is so much out there. If you like music this is a great time to be alive.
    Taping shit from college radio, and never really knowing what you heard until years later.

    Now mixtapes come with a full set list.

  5. #25
    I would also use public libraries to find music. I hadn't thought about using them until my dad brought home a Ramones tape.

    People's lockers in high school were kind of like music ads because of posters put up. I wouldn't be exposed to something like say Suicidal Tendencies on the radio but if one of the metalheads or punk rockers had a picture, I would end up borrowing some tapes.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Josh View Post
    Kids these days don't even know, man. I used to spend hundreds of dollars on import CDs and trade cassettes with pen pals and shit to hear new things. Now you just have to fire up youtube.

    There is so much out there. If you like music this is a great time to be alive.
    So much. Finding music back in the day was like finding something sacred. I definitely would feel more of a bond to indie bands that I would find somehow and send away for their music. Join their clubs, etc.
    I guess the internet giveth and taketh away. Everything is almost too easy now. Nothing feels special.

    This record is special to me:



    I love Team Dresch so damn much. Personal Best is a masterpiece. It got me into female-fronted bands. So much power. Confusion. Emotion. Can't be replicated.
    Last edited by Changeling; 31 Dec 2014 at 06:39 PM.

  7. Sepultura -- Beneath the Remains

    Before I bought Beneath the Remains, I thought Metallica's Ride the Lightning was as intense as metal got. Then Sepultura charred my skull with a full album of "Fight Fires with Fires," as only "Inner Self" extinguishes its rhythmic blaze to a choking smoke during those introductory verses, with anti-everything lyrics that were exactly what this rebellious teen's tonsils wanted to scream in between the closing and opening school bell rings.

    BTR's also one of the first albums I learned to drum along to when I was getting up to speed with that instrument, though I could never keep pace with the Live Under Siege renditions of these songs, which are played at much quicker tempos; that VHS is the last one of those that I still own, as my trusty tape player is only used as an old-school gaming hookup, these days.

    Dead Kennedys -- Give Me Convenience or Give me Death

    Hardcore punk was thrash metal's skinnier, pimplier older brother, and while this isn't the best DK compilation (Plastic Surgery Disasters / In God We Trust INC. has more hits and fewer filler tracks), it was my initiation album, bought a few days after hearing "Police Truck" blaring from Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 1. These guys' lyrics just become more and more relevant as America's love of capitalism, classism, and Christianity continue to drag the country deeper into its cesspool of corruption.

    Cryptopsy -- None So Vile

    Lord Worm is the guy who convinced me that vocalists can just be background instrumentalists, and don't have to be spotlight-hogging, sing-songy storytellers. But what's funny is that his unintelligible lyrics, if you hold the hard-to-read album booklet in hospital-bright lighting, are actually some of the most intelligent and poetic in extreme metal. Jon Levasseur's slide-heavy riffs always reminded me more of daycare nursery rhymes than the chromatic hogwash you'll find inside most death metal band's instrumental playpen. And Levasseur's solos are written with a modal vocabulary more commonly observed in conservatory jazz than barroom rock and its ruder offshoots. Flo Mounier pounds his surgeon's-son-sized drum kit like a playground bully who's been whipped into a frenzy by the snacktime sugar rush of Gushers and red Hawaiian Punch.

    Hundreds of younger extreme metal acts have since surpassed this CD's top-of-its-class playing speed and physical brutality, but only a handful of bands have managed to match its compositional quality.

    Klaus Schulze -- Moondawn

    The album that launched my exploration into ambient music and '70s prog. Most Schulze discs are more epic in scope and cloudier in their composition, so this one being his most clear and concise work made it the perfect vehicle for a foray into outer musical space.

    Domenico Scarlatti -- Selected Harpsichord Sonatas (Performed By Anthony Newman)

    I'd describe Scarlatti as the more-fun-at-parties version of Bach. The keyboard was both men's favorite instrument, but Scarlatti's corset-tight bass parts are more restrained and supportive than Bach's free-moving left-fingered counterpoints. Domenico's melodies were also faster, more fanciful and trill-filled than Bach's straightlaced, single-note solemness, and while each composer was a master of his chosen Baroque-era domain, I've always sided more with wildmen than clergymen.

    Masayoshi Takanaka -- Rainbow Goblins Story

    He's been called the Japanese Santana, but I think Takanaka's S-Tier ears for melody/mind for composition rank at least two levels above Carlos', especially since Masayoshi's guitarwork is so strong that it carries most of his songs from start to finish, without needing to pay any vocalists or an entire entourage of percussionists.

    The original studio recording of this material is solid, but I prefer the faster speeds, longer solos, and rawer tone that the 1981 Budokan live show offers.

    I have Takanaka-san (and his countrymen Casiopea) to thank for sending me down the foreign jazz fusion rabbit hole.
    Last edited by jyoung; 01 Aug 2022 at 10:28 PM.

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