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Thread: The VR thread

  1. Quote Originally Posted by Tain View Post
    Quest Link is impressive. It's not quite as good as using a Rift S when you compare them back to back, but the tracking feels native. It's a super-consistent experience and whatever latency is present is extremely well-hidden. I'd still say that a Rift S is a better buy if your main thing is going to be PC gaming (more comfortable, the cable rests in the headset less strangely, better visuals), but man, what a good feature to add to the Quest via software updates. It's a legitimate option as a PC headset.
    Worth mentioning that the performance with existing cables is considered sub optimal. Oculus is releasing their own purpose-built fiber optic cable later that promises better performance.

  2. Quote Originally Posted by Tain View Post
    Quest Link is impressive. It's not quite as good as using a Rift S when you compare them back to back, but the tracking feels native. It's a super-consistent experience and whatever latency is present is extremely well-hidden. I'd still say that a Rift S is a better buy if your main thing is going to be PC gaming (more comfortable, the cable rests in the headset less strangely, better visuals), but man, what a good feature to add to the Quest via software updates. It's a legitimate option as a PC headset.
    Worth mentioning that the performance with existing cables is considered sub optimal. Oculus is releasing their own purpose-built fiber optic cable later that promises better performance.

  3. Tech costs too much sadly, I'll just wait here for it get less expensive and will join you in VR chat guys ))

  4. I need to dig this thread up. Half Life Alyx got me going and now Boneworks has me hooked. Those two games are the perfect introduction to VR and then expansion into the crazy shit VR can do. I don't think I can go back to flat games, at least for exploration type stuff. The amount of control to do ANYTHING in Boneworks is a game changer. A game pad can't compare. A flat monitor can't compare. As more people see this stuff, I don't know how it can't take over.

    The problem is there is no way to advertise it at all. Nothing can describe it except for trying it.

  5. I was really super jazzed about VR, and then kind of forgot about it.
    Standalone VR is still too primitive for my tastes, and tethered VR is a a bit too much of a nuisance, but I'm pretty optimistic that both of those things will be addressed in a couple of years.
    The headsets need to get a lot lighter and more comfortable before the masses get on board.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by kedawa View Post
    Standalone VR is still too primitive for my tastes, and tethered VR is a a bit too much of a nuisance, but I'm pretty optimistic that both of those things will be addressed in a couple of years.
    It's funny reading a post from like this from four months ago, and we're there. I can play wireless, 90Hz PC VR at 4K resolution on my Quest 2, and it's fucking good. Quest 2 is really impressive as a standalone, but even more impressive as a wireless PC VR headset. I've had it for a couple weeks now and I've really been blown away. It really solves a lot of the basic issues that have been keeping VR from getting to the mass market.

    1) The screens are incredible. While the field of view is still similar to Rift, rather than Index or G2, the pixel density is the highest of any consumer headset, which means text is crisp and comfortable to real, there's no screen door, you can browse the web or use a virtual desktop totally comfortably without straining your eyes. Game changing.

    2) The standalone experience is quite good for what it is. While I mostly got this to use with my PC, the PC is a huge barrier of entry for most people interested in VR, and yet most standalone/mobile headsets are not good enough to recommend. But this, this actually good VR, even as a stand alone. Graphically, it can't compete with PC, but amazingly it can seemingly deliver roughtly PSVR-quality graphics, with infinitely better tracking and image quality. It can play real games and give users who don't have access to PC a really good experience. The resolution and foveated rendering are massively, massively improved and visuals actually look crisp and clear.

    3) It's a really good wireless PC headset. With nothing more than a good 5Ghz router with a wired connection to your PC, you can use Virtual Desktop to play PC VR games over Wi-Fi, and the latency and image quality is better than Quest 1 WITH a wire. In fact, the image quality is better than Quest 2 with a wired connection (though the Oculus Link software hasn't been optimized for Quest 2 yet and will improve). It's good enough to play Beat Saber, Half Life Alyx, and Pistol Whip, it's better than TPCast or Vive Pro Wireless. It has some drawbacks, especially because it doesn't support ASW, which smooths over dropped frames, so you have to make sure you have the the GPU power and settings to keep a stable framerate without it. It might not ideal if you have an older GPU but for me it's perfect in the vast majority of my games, and I can take advantage of a big untethered play space in my living room, and it's just a much better experience than being tethered to the PC.

    4) It's $300 and that's everything you need. The importance of that in the world of consumer electronics is huge. It's not just "affordable," for an enthusiast gamer, it's also something you can give to your dad, with no gaming PC and he's gonna have a good experience and get value out of it. Obviously PC VR is gonna be better and have more AAA experiences, but the fact that this can do both at best in class quality is huge.

    It might not have a bigger field of view or varifocal display or eye-tracking, all these next-gen features you hear about, but it's a much bigger breakthrough in terms of being the whole package at an affordable price, and the screen resolution/clarity and wireless play are huge game-changers.
    Last edited by Frogacuda; 02 Nov 2020 at 03:53 PM.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Frogacuda View Post
    Quest 2 is really impressive as a standalone, but even more impressive as a wireless PC VR headset.
    Thanks Frog. So are there any cons to getting this as an update to my Rift? I have the nightmare Dev Rift and the one that is wired and a pretty big upgrade from the dev version with the wireless touch and the wired sensors? I'd want to use it with my new PC. Would I need to buy anything beyond the $300
    look here, upon a sig graveyard.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by sedition View Post
    Thanks Frog. So are there any cons to getting this as an update to my Rift? I have the nightmare Dev Rift and the one that is wired and a pretty big upgrade from the dev version with the wireless touch and the wired sensors? I'd want to use it with my new PC. Would I need to buy anything beyond the $300
    I sold my Rift after using the Quest 2 for a couple days. Other than the link cable still being a work-in-progress, with 90FPS coming "soon", it's an overall fantastic upgrade. You can actually read text now without it having to be cartoonishly huge.

  9. So Oculus rolled out some new updates last week, making good on their promises of improving Link, supporting 90Hz, native res and beyond, and much improved compression. There is a caveat on the latter that the improvements to compression rely on the hardware in newer gen (RTX) video card. Might also work on the upcoming AMD cards but not the ones on the market right now.

    But man, between that and the new version of Virtual Desktop dropping some crazy latency improvements, this thing is now a pretty fucking serious contender in the PC VR space, in addition to the not-exactly-competitive standalone space. The image quality with a wired connection with a high bitrate looks really great now, compression is all but invisible.

    It feels like a huge, huge improvement over the Rift and Rift S, and honestly you could put it in the conversation with the high end headsets like Index and Reverb G2, higher res and wireless are selling points over Index, and better tracking and wireless are selling points over Reverb. I've been playing my old PC VR favorites with new eyes now.

    If ever there was a piece of hardware that could break VR into the mainstream, this seems like it. Cheap, accessible, good, and works for both casuals and the existing hardcore PC gamer base.

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