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Thread: Completion Thread 2019: Would You Buy That for a Dollar?

  1. 25. Control



    TAKE. CONTROL. This was really good. The visuals are stunning: the environments are clean and cold and elegant, the destruction effects are some of the best I've seen in the genre in years (maybe the most I've been impressed since Max Payne), and the real-time raytracing (better-implemented here than anywhere else I've seen) lends everything a super-cohesive look. The plot is a bit whatever in the end but I appreciated the tone of the game and there was a pretty decent sense of mystery throughout.

    The combat built on Quantum Break in a way I didn't expect. QB stripped away some elements common to third person shooters, and instead of reinstating those, Control almost takes on an Armored Core feel. The game still has aim-down-sights, but hip fire is often enough unless you're going for a headshot or using one of the more precise weapons. There's no formal reload mechanic, only cooldowns on your living weapon and your psi abilities. You'll levitate, you'll bring up shields, and one of your abilities is a fast, long dash with a real pause at the end. Enemies often fire homing missiles that make you flex it. There's no cover system, and you can't even fire from crouch. It's pretty fast and unique and sometimes tricky (thankfully the game's only difficulty level is pretty well-balanced). These battles get scattered around a vaguely Metroid-sized world, which is just right and has some pretty awesome side-missions. There's a little bit of character progression bloat in the form of weapon mods, but like in all games where this stuff is tolerable instead of insufferable, you can mostly ignore it outside of the small core skill tree.

  2. I finally beat Dark Souls 3, and to be honest, I'm a bit disappointed. It doesn't do anything different than the first game, and it doesn't even do the established mechanics and level design any better. Poorly-designed stages, insanely convoluted side quest requirements, and some really bad camera work in boss battles make this the worst of the trilogy for me. I still have to do the DLC, but I'm not expecting anything better.

  3. Quote Originally Posted by Melf View Post
    I finally beat Dark Souls 3, and to be honest, I'm a bit disappointed. It doesn't do anything different than the first game, and it doesn't even do the established mechanics and level design any better. Poorly-designed stages, insanely convoluted side quest requirements, and some really bad camera work in boss battles make this the worst of the trilogy for me. I still have to do the DLC, but I'm not expecting anything better.
    Huh, that’s the exact opposite take I had.
    Xbox Live- SamuraiMoogle

  4. I started it immediately after completing the first one (remastered), and I feel that he original is just a better designed game overall.

  5. I'm going to have to replay 3 now. I don't miss the crabs but I loved the rest of it.

  6. I correct my initial statement. After playing 2, it is definitely the weakest. Granted, that's because the first game was remastered to benefit from the advances made in part 3, basically making it the best one. Part 2 has some great stuff in it, but it really needs a remaster. It's a major step back in terms of gameplay after playing the others. Estus drinking is painfully slow, roll-dodging is far less effective, and the lock-on is wonkier. Also, they made Scholar of the First Sin a lot harder! Enemies are really numerous and brutal. It's hard to do a straight up strength build this time around.

  7. #10 Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night (XB1)

    This is an excellent follow-up to SotN, but doesn't quite reach that game's overall design. The castle mostly is pretty boring and one section blends into another. But the game gives you so many weapons and magic (shards) to experiment with, that is really where I had the most fun. One minute I was shooting laser from my hand, the next I am summoning flying pigs against boss fights. I finished all the sidequests (some of which are a PITA) and beat all enemies (I really like how some of them are very well hidden). I am at 99.6% of the castle so I just want to discover the last few hidden spots. The game crashed a lot in the first 10 hour or so but didn't crash once since (finished at about 32 hours). I think the latest patch fixed a lot of the issues. Anyway, I might replay this someday but then I should probably replay SotN first.

  8. 26. The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening (2019)



    This is the densest 2D Zelda game, probably, and that's probably why I prefer it over Link to the Past. There's something neat about the basic Ys-like plot, the dungeons are exactly as long as they should be, and some of the bosses are genuinely fun to fight! That endgame puzzle is a cool change of pace. I think the remake is a better game than the original mostly due to the fluid Hyrule camera, but the adorable look helps. Hero mode is a bit silly in the world map (you respawn exactly where you die), but it works well in dungeons. Shame about the fluctuating performance.

  9. 27. Sayonara Wild Hearts



    Fantastic experience aesthetically. Super stylish visuals and a wonderful soundtrack that the game is deeply tied to. It's worth playing for this alone, not unlike Rez. You'll breeze through it very quickly, with frequent infinite-retry checkpoints, but there's some mechanical fun to be had trying to get Gold ranks on each of the game's very short stages. My complaints are with how the game's stages and retry points are structured: the standard game mode provides almost no challenge unless you're going for score, and constantly interrupts the flow by taking you back to the stage selection between each stage. Only after beating the game are you given the option to play the entire series of stages without interruption, and only after gold-ranking everything to you get the only mode with limited lives. It kills me thinking about how much better this arcade-inspired game would be if it simply offered some kind of arcade-structured mode from the get go.

  10. 28. Monolith



    This is a pretty good and mostly arcade-structured twin-stick shooter. It's like a more elegant Enter the Gungeon, with a smaller set of weapons and no default invincible dodge roll. The cast of bosses is pretty big and has some really unique designs, the single-screen arenas have a lot of clever layouts despite their size, and for having so much randomization I'm generally surprised at how balanced it all feels. Still have to find the hard mode that apparently exists!
    Last edited by Tain; 27 Oct 2019 at 09:03 PM.

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